Get ‘Em To The Groomer!

Clean pets are happy pets!

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How would you feel if your hair was caked with dirt and oil? What if your nails were long, jagged and prevented you from performing daily tasks? How about walking around with poop on you jeans?

This is how your pet feels when they aren’t properly groomed.  The grooming needs of short-haired and long-haired pets vary greatly.   Short-haired dogs and cats require just the basics.  Long-haired pets need a little extra TLC.

Having a short-haired pet is simpler and fits well into a get-up-and-go lifestyle. Bathing dogs one to two times a month is sufficient.  Over bathing can strip skin of important oils.  Most healthy, short-haired cats groom themselves. They aren’t big fans of the water!  Unless….you’re this cat.

Long-haired cats and dogs require much more attention.  Choosing to own a long-haired breed is both a luxury and responsibility.  Daily brushing and frequent trips to the groomer are the best way to keep these pets happy.

For both cats and dogs, matted fur is painful. It hides skin problems.  Mats around the perianal area make it difficult for pets to defecate and often cause ulcerated skin from urine scalding.  Keeping these areas neat, tidy and hair-free will prevent these common problems.  Prevent this painful experience for your pet.

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Long hair in and around ears can trap debris and cause ear infections.  Ears should be checked regularly.  Your veterinarian can suggest or prescribe and ear wash that’s appropriate for your pet.

Monthly nail trims are also important. This will keep them short and prevent them from overgrowing into the foot pads, or snagging on anything . If you can’t safely do it at home, schedule an appointment with your groomer or veterinarian.

Tech Tips

Choose the right tools.

  • Brushes for shorter hair
  • Combs for longer hair
  • I love the Ferminator! I works for everyone!
  • Nail clippers
    • For cats I use scissors-style
    • For dogs I like pliers-style

Nail-trimmers

 

 

 

 

Bathing

  • Put cotton balls in ears to prevent water from getting in the ear canal. *Remember to remove them.*
  • Only use shampoo for appropriate for the correct species.
  • Water-less shampoos are a good option if you can’t get Fido and Fifi in for a bath.  They work great in a pinch!

Trim nails more often to help shorten the quick over time.nail-labels

  • Avoid cutting too short and hitting the quick.
  • Have your vet or groomer show you how to trim nails

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Use a self-service dog wash.

 

Find a good groomer.

  • Ask your friends, family or vet for a groomer referral.

Make grooming fun! Reward pets with a treat they love!

Author: Aubrie Ricketts

Experienced Licensed Veterinary Technician, Executive Master of Business Administration - University of Nevada, Reno. I love marketing and promoting preventative medicine and pet wellness. I have a dedicated passion for veterinary anesthesia and pain management.

2 thoughts on “Get ‘Em To The Groomer!”

  1. Hi Aubrie, I’m a big fan of DIY so I end up doing all my own dog maintenance. I’ve been using a dremel tool to sand down my dog’s nails. It seems to work pretty well, but I always worry about it getting too hot. Is that a legit concern? My dog is too laid back to complain about anything so I never know if it is a real problem.

    I also noticed you are linking to my wordpress page in your blogroll. I don’t use that at all. Everything is done from my personal website http://www.mattwarnert.com

    Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Matt,
      First off, I will change update your site in my blogroll! Thanks!
      As far as the dremel tool, they work great. We use one at work all the time.
      I have also had the same concern about heat causing pain. I’d don’t find the tool itself to give off much heat, but I like to alternate between toes to give the nail time to cool.
      We use the dremel tool for beak and nail trims on birds, and they are HIGHLY sensitive. I haven’t seen any birds react negatively, nor dogs for that matter. In my opinion, you are safe to use it, but I always err on the side of caution!
      Aubrie

      Liked by 1 person

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